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My K-Pop Awakening Part 3: I Saw Both My Bias Groups In One Month

안녕하세요! UIC Radio 소니아 입니다.

It’s been such a wild ride.

So, I know undergoing this ~K-Pop Awakening~ (I now say with a hint of an eyeroll @ myself) has been weird, not only for me but also for my friends and probably everyone I know as well. K-pop, as I learned, can pretty much completely take over a person’s life, and I now realize I am a living example of this. Where is my shame, though? Do I have any? I really don’t think so anymore.

I learned a lot by entering the k-pop community. First: there is rarely such a thing as a casual fan. You either hardcore stan a group (or more than one, in most cases) or you don’t. Gray areas don’t exist, and once you catch feelings for a group, there’s no turning back.

Second: k-pop fans have no chill. Contrasting to my last point, this can vary from fan to fan. You can show your love for your group in small ways such as wearing items of jewelry or clothing adorned with the group’s relative symbols or your bias’s name, whereas other times fan groups with numbers in the hundreds or thousands get together and purchase ad space in Times Square to honor their bias group’s anniversary or plaster their faces on a bus for their birthdays. How they manage to pull it off is beyond me, but there is no denying the love they have for these groups and members is real.

Third: the k-pop community is one of the most accepting communities I’ve ever been a part of. Aside from fan wars (which is a completely different story), every person I’ve met and disclosed my “I don’t know what is happening to me but I love it” spiel to has given me a look of sympathy and said “it’s okay, I’ve been there too and I know what you’re going through and you will be okay,” followed by an exchange of how we discovered our bias groups and/or consequently gotten sucked into the k-pop void. It’s comforting to know that having your entire mindset and lifestyle taken over by this stuff is not only not unusual, but it is rampant, and you form an immediate bond with everyone else who this has happened to. In losing yourself, you find others.


Fourth: K-pop groups don’t come to America very often, but when they do, everything happens so fast. I am used to western artists announcing a tour anywhere from several months to more than a year before they actually hit your city. This gives you plenty of time to plan when you can go, maybe save up for a ticket or at least purchase it and make the money back later, but for k-pop groups, you get maybe a month or two’s notice before they begin a tour. This is stressful as h e c k. Not only are you bewildered that your bias group is coming to America at all, can you actually go? And if you can, can you afford it?? (Ticket prices are no joke, even the cheapest seats are half of one of my minimum-wage pay checks). If you’re able to take off school or work (which many, if not most k-pop fans go to that extent to do), you’re set… that is, as long as you’re part of a major US city. Likely, if you live anywhere that’s not NYC, LA, or Chicago, among other factors (being underage/can’t travel by yourself, can’t drive, can’t take off school/work, etc), you have to face the agony knowing your favorite group is in your country for once but it’s impossible for you to go see them.

Being a k-pop fan is not easy, especially when your dream is to see your favorite groups live even once in your life. In stanning these groups, both your pride and your wallet often ache with frustration.

That being said, in a surprising turn of events…

I got to see both of my bias groups within a month of each other!! Something I thought I would never get to do in this lifetime!!! Especially considering I’ve only adopted this lifestyle for a mere few months, whereas most of the k-pop fans I’ve met have been into this stuff for years. I’d be lucky to catch even one group’s show, but for once the stars (and my bank account, miraculously) aligned and I managed to see both of the two k-pop groups I fell in love with over the fall! Continue reading “My K-Pop Awakening Part 3: I Saw Both My Bias Groups In One Month”

Donald Trump Isn’t The Problem


160316-daly-trump-clinton-tease_dpubuo.jpgSource: Maring Photography/Getty


Donald Trump did not create the current awfulness of our politics; he is the product of it. Every evil, nasty thing you see on TV with the name ‘TRUMP’ attached to it is not his idea, not his creation. Trump doesn’t have original creations. He is just a name, a name to attach to other people’s creations, be they buildings, golf courses or horrific, life-ending legislation. To quote HBO’s John Oliver, he was (initially) a ‘sh*tty lifestyle brand,’ nothing more.

I say this because I have a very real fear that if Donald Trump leaves, so will people’s interest and awareness of the mess in this country. It is because people failed to be interested for so long that Donald Trump became president. It is because of passive disinterest, not active evil, that he came to power. All-too-common attitudes like, “I don’t care about politics,” ultimately gave him way more leverage than the minority of people who chanted, “Make America great again!”

Studies have shown… what the rich want [politically], the rich get, and when it comes to the rest of us, tough luck!

State and local community issues need to become a focus, and they are something we can start focusing. on. now. Both Democrats and Republicans alike have betrayed us, to varying degrees, for favor of the upper class. Studies have shown when it comes to actual results and enacted policies, what the rich want, the rich get, and when it comes to the rest of us, tough luck! This is oligarchy. Donald Trump isn’t the reason Illinois doesn’t have a budget. Donald Trump isn’t the reason colleges are in danger of shutting down. Admittedly his decisions are exacerbating all of this, but these dilemmas existed well before his rise to power. If Hillary had been elected, we would still be dealing with our problems closer to home (and many/most of the national ones, as well). It all originates at the top.

There’s no reason for it to be this way. Way more of us exist than them. Waiting a potential four (or god forbid, eight) years for one human’s time to be up is a strategy for brutal loss. This is something Bernie has been practically screaming from his old, tired lungs ever since the election started. Just as Trump can’t be solely responsible for the bad, as many before me have desperately pointed out, Bernie (nor any one president/figure) can’t be the sole source of good. It is our responsibility to fix this mess at all levels, continuously, as collective Americans. I don’t have all the answers. I just know what isn’t the answer. And the answer isn’t to start and stop our activism with Donald Trump. 🇺🇸


Trev Richards is host of the weekly talk program Trev on UIC Radio; Live, Mondays 8:30 – 10:30 PM Central Time. Follow/listen on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, iTunes and SoundCloud

Fast Romantics Interview with Noteworthy

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Photo credit: Jen Squires

Ivan of Noteworthy here again (Mondays, 6PM-8PM at uicradio.org). Make sure to mark your calendar for this Wednesday, June 28. Fast Romantics, an indie rock band out of Toronto with a flair for big Springsteen-style hooks, will be performing at Township (2200 N. California Ave.) in support of their latest album, American Love. I spoke with lead singer/guitarist Matthew Angus through e-mail (pictured 3rd from right) about love in times of political turmoil and rebuilding the band.

Noteworthy: For folks who may be hearing about you for the first time, tell us the origin of the name Fast Romantics.

The name Fast Romantics precedes this band.  It was the result of a brainstorming session we had in the very first version of the [group] many years ago. We just locked ourselves in a room and came out with those words. There’s no meaning behind it really. But when we reformed Fast Romantics a couple of years ago with all these new members, we decided to keep the moniker, and now it’s just one of those meaningless names you give to anybody. Like “The Beatles” or … “Fred.”

NW: The band got its start in Calgary and you recently filmed the video for “Alberta” there during a tour off day spent visiting family and friends. What is one surprising thing about the town that most people wouldn’t know about it?

Calgary is known for the Calgary Stampede and most people in America picture it as full of cowboy hats and boots and rodeos and farms but really it’s nothing like that at all. It’s become a pretty cosmopolitan town with a lot of amazing subcultures and a thriving music scene.

NW: Another American Love track, “Why We Fight” was recently played during a broadcast of this year’s NHL playoffs. What was that moment like and do you have any all-time favorite players from the Calgary Flames?

It did, that was a trip. As Canadians, having your song open up a hockey playoff game is kinda like playing the Grammys, it’s a big deal y’know. You’re talking to a band of mostly Toronto Maple Leafs fans, believe it or not, but Jeff’s still holding out for the Flames. Me personally, even though I’m a Leafs fan, you gotta love former Flame Lanny McDonald. Not only was he a badass hockey player but I went to school with his daughter and met him a bunch, and he’s just a super nice guy. Continue reading “Fast Romantics Interview with Noteworthy”

The Dr. Paula Show, Tuesday 6/27 At 11 AM: Dr. Andrew Boyd

Andrew BoydThe June 27th airing of the Dr. Paula Show will feature Dr. Andy Boyd, M.D. Dr. Boyd will be talking with Dr. Paula about what the term “health informatics” means, how it can be used to address issues of low health literacy in diverse patient populations, and will also discuss some of the research he is currently working on in the area of patient engagement.

Dr. Boyd is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical and Health Information Sciences. He was awarded the 2015 UIC Researcher of the Year in Clinical Sciences, Rising Star award for his contribution to the field of Health Informatics.  He serves on the UIC senate, and is a member of the Information Technology Governance Research Committee. He has been a PI, Co-PI, Co-I on numerous grants from the NIH, DOD, and private foundations. Dr. Boyd’s research focuses on “data simplification to improve clinical outcomes” engaging administrators, researchers and patients.

If you have any suggestions for topics or interviews you would like to hear on the Dr. Paula Show, let us know! Contact Brienne Lowry at bdavis7@uic.edu.

The Dr. Paula Show, Tuesday 6/13 At 11 AM: Dr. Robert Molokie

DID YOU KNOW JUNE 19TH IS WORLD SICKLE CELL DAY?

To learn more about this SCD, click here

molokieThe next Dr. Paula Show features Dr. Robert Molokie, Associate Professor in the Division of Hematology and Oncology in the UIC Department of Medicine. The show will air on June 13th at 11:00 AM. He will be sharing his thoughts on his role at the UIC Sickle Cell Center, how health literacy of patients impact their treatment and outcomes and Health Injustice in patients with Sickle Cell and how to reduce them.

Dr. Molokie is an Associate Professor in the Division of Hematology and Oncology in the UIC Department of Medicine.  He received his medical degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago and continued on to complete an internal medicine residency at the University as well. He then went on to complete a hematology/oncology fellowship at Loyola University Medical Center. He was awarded the Regional Top Doctor by Castle Connolly in 2014. His area of interest is sickle cell anemia. He is also a Co-Investigator on the NIH funded study on chronic pain in adults with sickle cell disease.

If you have any suggestions for topics or interviews you would like to hear on the Dr. Paula Show, let us know! Contact Brienne Lowry at bdavis7@uic.edu.

Blues and News: Kingston Mines Interview

Kingston Mines Logo

For my upcoming show on Sunday, May 21st, I will be airing an interview with Donna and Lisa Pellegrino from the Kingston Mines Blues Club. During our conversation, we discussed some of the club’s history and impact on the Chicago Blues Scene. Coincidentally, I interviewed them during the club’s 49th year anniversary.

Kingston Mines is owned by Dr. Lenin ‘Doc’ Pellegrino, who will be celebrating his 92nd birthday this August. The club originally was founded in 1968 by a group of individuals as a non-profit organization called the Kingston Mines Theatre Company located at 2356 North Lincoln Avenue. The theatre offered a variety of acts and entertainment, including musical productions, poetry readings, Blues music, Folk Music and more.  In fact, the original version of “Grease” the musical was premiered at the Kingston Mines Theatre.

The live Blues music proved to be the most successful at the Theatre. Eventually, the original founders parted ways with the theatre and pursued their interests through different routes. ‘Doc’ purchased the rights to the club in 1972. In the early 1980’s the Kingston Mines relocated to its new location at 2548 N. Halsted Street. Many Blues Legends have performed at the Kingston Mines, including but not limited to Koko Taylor, Magic Slim, Valerie Wellington, and Eddie Shaw just to name a few. I should also mention that a lot of rock stars tend to stop by the club. The Rolling Stones were frequent visitors and even would perform live on stage. If you go to the club today, some of the artists you will find include Billy Branch, Vance Kelly, Mike Wheeler, Joanna Connor, Nellie Travis, Nora Jean Bruso.

Kingston Mines Outside

Part of the Kingston Mines’ great success as a long-standing Blues Club is their ability to attract a diverse audience of all types.

Sunday – Thursdays, college students (and faculty) can get into the club for free. Fridays- Saturdays, college students(and faculty) can get a discounted rate. You need a valid ID for the discounted rates, and you must be 21 years or older to go to Kingston Mines.  They offer two bands on two different stages, every night.

Kingston Mines is open every day of the year (including holidays).  They are located at 2548 N. Halsted Street. For more information about the Kingston Mines, then you can visit their website at www.KingstonMines.com.

Doc Pellegrino is an alumnus of the University of Illinois at Chicago. In February of 2004, Doc was awarded the “City Partner Award” from the University of Illinois Alumni Association for his “outstanding contribution to the vitality of the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Chicago Metropolitan Area. His daughter Lisa Pellegrino and son, Frank Pellegrino are also UIC Alumni.

Make sure you tune into Blues and News with Brother Jacob this Sunday, May 21st from 6 pm – 8 pm (CST) for the full interview with Donna and Lisa Pellegrino.

Personal Space: PWR BTTM and How Online Mob Culture Hurts Both Accusers and the Accused

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Lena Dunham and Matthew Rhys, S6E3 of HBO’s GIRLS

Earlier this year, my favorite show GIRLS made waves with a bottle episode called “American Bitch,” in which the main character Hannah meets one of her literary idols, the fictional Chuck Palmer. Chuck’s had some allegations made against him- several women have come forward on the Internet with claims that he sexually assaulted them, specifically, that he forced several of them into oral sex on his book tour. Hannah, a burgeoning writer, publishes a piece on a “niche feminist website” expressing her rage and frustration at the accusations, stating “If one more male writer I love reveals himself to be a heinous sleazebag, I’m going to do a bunch of murders, create a new isle of Lesbos, and never look back.”

Continue reading “Personal Space: PWR BTTM and How Online Mob Culture Hurts Both Accusers and the Accused”

A Working Spring

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Courtesy of Lost TV.

Three jobs and twenty one credit hours have kept me off of UIC Radio’s front page this semester, much to the dismay of my twelve readers (I ❤ you guys & gals). A busy spring also kept Nick V, Cheech, and me from sitting down in the same room together for about two months. When we finally found overlapping free time, we spent the better part of two hours animatedly talking about Syria, Chicago’s water, and the prison system. But between catching up and conversations eventually bleeding into politics, I managed to ask a few questions and listen to some phenomenal answers.

I wanted to interview the FreeFAM founders for a second time. Last fall, they’d impressed me with their business-minded approach to their genre. Without sacrificing individuality and independence, they seek to create a brand to support all kinds of artists. Coming from a city with a music culture that’s very “out-for-yourself,” their message is refreshing. FAM is in the name.

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Courtesy of Lost TV.

 

An obligatory catch-up is needed first, as these guys have not sat still since the last time they visited UIC Radio’s studio. They’ve been playing gigs, traveling, and working with producers like CB Mix, credited on Chance’s Coloring BookThey’re working with LRG to create clothing and Pat Banahan of Lost TV to make videos. The group just released a music video for Bless the Bottles, (my personal favorite so far) featuring the same BMW I8 King Louie and Vonmar used in their own video. They even played a show at College of DuPage, which only sounds mildly impressive until you learn COD won’t back anyone without a tax ID and business number. They even have a website. FreeFAM is officially in business.

On Tuesday, I asked Nick V and Cheech about branding. I wanted to know what audience FreeFAM would draw as a full-blown music label complete with t-shirts and dispensaries. Both brothers said “local” immediately. They don’t want to limit themselves to Chicago, but their focus is building up a platform to support all members of music production. Their circle includes engineers and videographers, animators, and even a few family members for legal counsel. The want anyone who’s drawn to an image of family, brothers, positive moves, and a platform that’s there to serve their clients. Cheech commented that “non-threatening artists” are what resonate in Chicago today.

 

Nick said he wants people with energy. “Energy to party, to help, to create.” He’s got a vision of FreeFAM as a charity and force for good in Chicago. We inevitably broke into ranting about senators and bills, but Nick had a ton to say about water quality. It was endearing and inspiring and had me walking home thinking how one could add water filters to a music label…But that’s beside the point.

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Courtesy of Lost TV.

I asked about brands that could “make or break” an artist. Lil Wayne and Cash Money were brought up, as was Future, who got in a legal battle with his manager and was forced to release two albums ahead of time so he could start making his own money. Some artists get caught promoting BS; Cheech brought up the Fyre Festival flop. But Jay-Z’s own streaming website was mentioned as a positive. “It all depends on if a brand will encourage or control you,” Nick told me. A label obviously wants a return on investment and will have to control an artist’s image if money is lost. So who’s got their label working for them? Cheech laughed at this thought and brought up Kanye. “His label has been taking so much money from his music. Someone’s been making 50% off all of his songs.”

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Photo courtesy of Lost TV.

Controlling the artist is beyond the aims of the Freedom Family. Both brothers explained respect for their artist is the only reason they’d sign someone, and there’s no need to control someone they respect. They don’t intend to cultivate a brand that interferes with music production or limits the evolution and development of an artist.

“At the end of the day, music is the most important. But music won’t be heard without branding.” Other groups have PR people to handle web pages, social media, and scheduling. But for FreeFAM, “It’s just me and Cheech,” Nick says. The work is taking a toll; Nick V’s been off social media and left with what sounds like carpal tunnel in his hands and a prescription for range-of-motion exercises. “Shouldn’t be constantly posting, anyway,” he admitted. I told him not to worry about it. “It’s always nice to hear from family.”

 

Have a Scien-tastic Day!

American Rage and Suburban Malaise: A Study of the Urban Punk Underground

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Martha’s Got a Limp Wrist (Photo by Christian Contreras)

This piece has been censored for the UIC Radio blog.

It’s difficult to write about punk without draining it of its chaos.

The greatest punk shows are soaked in sweat and blown into the red. The best punk lyrics are incomprehensible, the best punk venues include a highly suspect dirty mattress in the corner, and the best punk showgoer is one who will sweat all over you, push you into other strangers, scream in your face, and then let you bum a cigarette at the end of the night. When writing about punk neglects to include that sense of disorder and entropy, you get sterile talk of what is, above all, the art of violent, cathartic release.

When I was a teenager, DIY punk shows in Chicago were my safe haven. Growing up gay, there are very few spaces in which you know that you’re not the only outcast- which isn’t to say that I was some sort of hunchbacked adolescent hermit, but when you come out of the closet early, there’s a very thin line you have to walk, knowing all the eyes that rest on you. Getting drunk, then moshing and screaming and sweating in trashed apartments on the weekends was just the sort of chaotic release I needed to keep from cracking under the pressure.

There’s an energy at every great punk show that finds its way up your spine and lets you know you aren’t the only one who just needs a f*cking break. There are systems in place working against all of us- some more complicated or institutionalized than others- but the fun of a punk show is sourced from the moment it allows for young, frustrated, bored, and fed up people to stop needing to think for a while.

Eventually though, you stop being seventeen years old and it’s no longer socially acceptable to struggle through an Aquafina bottle full of whiskey, sweat through your shirt and make out with a high schooler at the end of the night.

Continue reading “American Rage and Suburban Malaise: A Study of the Urban Punk Underground”

The Dr. Paula Show, Re-airing Interview with Dr. Mona Khanna

monaThe Dr. Paula Show will be re-airing our interview with Dr. Mona Khanna, M.D on Tuesday, May 16th at 11 AM. She will be sharing her thoughts on the delivery of health services and information to the incredibly diverse populations, the importance and challenges involved in providing the public with clear and accurate information and the challenges experienced while promoting health literacy in terms of patient care.

Dr. Mona is a triple board-certified medical doctor and an Emmy award-winning medical journalist who is committed to making a difference in the lives of others through raising health literacy and promoting healthy behaviors. Dr. Mona attended Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, and then went on to medical school at the University of Illinois, where she is now a Visiting Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine and Associate in the Center for Global Health. After completing medical school and three specialty residencies, she became one of the country’s youngest medical directors. She left executive medicine in 2002 with the goal of empowering patients through health education on television as a medical reporter. She travels annually on medical missions and is an acclaimed humanitarian and disaster volunteer for which she has been recognized with the 2013 American College of Physicians Volunteerism Award . At Ground Zero on September 11th , Dr. Mona became the first physician to report from the frontlines of a disaster site while providing care. She reported from New York after Superstorm Sandy, Port-au-Prince after the Haiti earthquake, New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, and Indonesia after the Indian Ocean tsunami. Dr. Mona has received more than 50 honors in the past decade, including five Emmy Award nominations, the Award of Valor from the National Association of Minority Media Executives and the Leadership Award from the American Medical Association Foundation. She has hosted and co-produced two award-winning ½-hour medical specials “Diagnosis: Cancer,” and “Cheap Medicine: Mexico’s Medications.” She has empowered people across the globe through television, radio, magazine, newspaper and online heath reports as well as her work as an emergency volunteer, and is a popular event speaker on health disparities, leadership, public health, emergency preparedness, humanitarianism, and medicine and the media.

Do you have an idea for a Dr. Paula Show topic? Is there someone you would like to hear interviewed on the topic of health literacy? Share you suggestions with us! Contact Brienne Lowry at bdavis7@uic.edu.